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RUTGERS CANCER INSTITUTE OF NEW JERSEY IN THE NEWS MAY 2022
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Extensive Research Underway To Address Cancer Disparities
May 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Positive
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New Jersey Patch - Ongoing research focusing on cancer disparities features members from the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence at Rutgers Cancer Inst. To highlight the importance of lifesaving cancer research, National Cancer Research Month, led by the American Association for Cancer Research, is recognized during May. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey together with RWJBarnabas Health, the state's only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, has curated a selection of ongoing research focusing on cancer disparities which features members from the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence. Read More
Exploring Sun Protection Behaviors Among U.S. Hispanic Outdoor Workers
May 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - In a recent study, researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state's only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, examined both sunburns and sun protection behaviors among male Hispanic outdoor day laborers in the Northeast U.S. Carolyn J. Heckman, PhD, co-leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute and an associate professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, is corresponding author and shares more on the work which was published in the February 2022 online edition of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. What are key challenges in promoting sun safety practices of outdoor day laborers? Some key challenges include length of working hours in the sun due to occupational, barriers to wearing long pants and a long-sleeved shirt, their perception that skin looking better with a tan. Read More
Noninvasive Brain Tumor Treatment Gives Physicians Pinpoint Accuracy
May 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Despite its name, gamma knife is not a blade that cuts or requires a physician to make an incision in your head. Gamma knife is a non-surgical treatment option that uses high doses of precisely focused radiation beams to destroy cancer cells and non-cancerous tumors. Joseph P. Weiner, MD, radiation oncologist at Rutgers Cancer Institute and assistant professor of radiation oncology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, who specializes in malignant and benign cancers of the brain and spine shares more about this treatment. Who is a good candidate for this type of treatment? The procedure has been especially effective in helping to reduce the size of tumors that develop in the brain. Some conditions treated using the gamma knife at Rutgers Cancer Institute and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital are both metastatic and primary brain tumors, such as glioma, meningioma, acoustic neuroma and pituitary adenoma. Non-cancerous conditions treated include arteriovenous malformations and certain pain syndromes such as trigeminal neuralgia. Read More
5 Tips To Boost Bladder Health
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May 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - The bladder is part of the urinary system, which filters waste products from the blood and transports the waste products out of the body through urine. Cancer of the bladder develops when abnormal cells in the bladder start to grow out of control. While researchers are working to better understand the causes of bladder cancer, there a number of things impacting bladder health that can be controlled with a lifestyle adjustment. Saum Ghodoussipour, MD, urologic oncologist and director of the Bladder and Urothelial Cancer Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute and assistant professor of surgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, shares more. Quit Smoking. Smoking is by far the biggest risk factor for developing bladder cancer. People who smoke cigarettes are up to four times more likely than nonsmokers to develop the disease. The good news is that cigarette smoking is a risk factor that can be controlled with a change in lifestyle. Taking action to quit now will reduce the likelihood of bladder cancer developing later. Read More
Young Cancer Survivors May Face Education, Job Difficulties
May 03 | Online Publication| Megan Brooks  |  Reach: 12,044,567 | Sentiment : Neutral
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Medscape - In a review of 82 relevant studies from 17 countries, Katie A. Devine, MPH, PhD, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, and colleagues found that overall survivors of CAYA cancers are more likely to have lower educational achievement compared with siblings, peers, or the general population. As a group, CAYA cancer survivors are also at greater risk for delays completing their education and repeating a grade compared with controls. (Subscription Required) Read More
University Hospital and Rutgers Partner With the College of American Pathologists Foundation for a See, Test & Treat Cancer Screening Event
May 03 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 167,087 | Sentiment : Positive
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Insider NJ - Backed by a grant from the College of American Pathologists Foundation, University Hospital, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, and the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey at University Hospital will partner for a See, Test & Treat cancer screening program on Wednesday, May 4 at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 205 South Orange Avenue in Newark. The event will run from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and appointments are required. Parking will be free for those attending the event. Read More
Rutgers Protein Data Bank Expands Storage, Research Access With AWS
May 04 | Online Publication| Jessica Perry  |  Reach: 24,599 | Sentiment : Positive
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NJBIZ - Part of the Rutgers Institute for Quantitative Biomedicine, the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank is expanding its storage capabilities. “For more than five decades, the global Protein Data Bank has enabled basic, translational, and clinical research by providing open access to three-dimensional biostructure information at the atomic level,” said Dr. Stephen Burley, director of the RCSB PDB, founding director of Rutgers Institute for Quantitative Biomedicine, university professor and Henry Rutgers Chair at Rutgers University. “The Protein Data Bank plays an important role in facilitating discovery and development of lifechanging drugs,” added Burley, who also co-leads the Cancer Pharmacology Research Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. (Subscription Required) Read More
Love Your Skin This Summer
May 04 | Online Publication| Samantha Anton  |  Reach: 1,493,932 | Sentiment : Neutral
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TAPinto.net - How can you protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays? Franz Smith, MD, Medical Director, The Melanoma Center, Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center, Northern Lead, Melanoma and Soft Tissue Oncology Program, and a member of the RWJBarnabas Health Medical Group, shares his best advice. "Keep an eye on your eyes. Wraparound sunglasses are a great choice to protect eyes and skin around the eyes from UV rays," he says. Read More
Assessing Sun Protection Behaviors Among U.S. Hispanic Outdoor Workers
May 09 | Online Publication  |  Reach: N/A | Sentiment : Neutral
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Derm.City - A new study from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey suggests the sunburn and sun protection habits among male U.S. Hispanic outdoor workers are not adequate, and that more education to improve these sun protection behaviours is needed. The group, led by Carolyn J. Heckman, PhD, an associate professor of medicine at Rutgers, studied a sample of 175 male, Hispanic day labourers in the U.S. Northeast. Read More
Genomic Analysis and Long-Term Outcomes of a Phase 1 Clinical Trial on Cytoreductive Radical Prostatectomy
May 09 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 26,751 | Sentiment : Neutral
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UroToday - Approximately 7% of patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer in the US will have have metastatic disease. The dogma that there is no role for surgery in this population has been questioned recently. Here we report long-term outcomes of a phase 1 clinical trial on cytoreductive radical prostatectomy. Authors include: Joshua Sterling, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick,  Eric A Singer, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Read More
Grant To Support TELESCOPE
May 09 | Blog| Carolyn Bloch  |  Reach: N/A | Sentiment : Positive
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Federal Telemedicine News - NIH has awarded a $3.5 million grant to Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey along with the Holden Cancer Center at the University of Iowa, and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, to address lung cancer screening disparities. The researchers will assess the effectiveness of a decision support intervention called “TELEhealth Shared decision-making COaching and navigation for lung cancer screening in Primary care”. TELESCOPE which will run for five years, will be the focus of a randomized clinical trial to be opened at 40 primary care practices within the Combined Medical Group of RWJBarnabas Health and in collaboration with the Rutgers Cancer Institute. Read More
Honoring Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Nurses
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May 11 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Positive
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New Jersey Patch - At Rutgers Cancer Institute, New Jersey's only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, oncology nurses play a vital role in the care of cancer patients, engage in research and serve as an education resource for their peers. To recognize the scope of their work, two nurses are named recipients of Rutgers Cancer Institute's 'Oncology Nursing Excellence Awards' during Nurses Week each year. Sondra J. Patella, MSN, RN, APN-C, advanced practice nurse at Rutgers Cancer Institute was selected by colleagues as one of this year's Oncology Nursing Excellence Award recipients. Patella's peers note that her sunny demeanor and unwavering commitment to patients and colleagues makes her a cherished collaborator. Described by her peers as "intelligent, passionate and hardworking," Julianne Dean RN, BSN, OCN, nurse clinician at Rutgers Cancer Institute was also chosen by colleagues as one of this year's Oncology Nursing Excellence Award recipients. "Oncology nursing is a lifelong journey of helping, healing and learning where specialized knowledge, skills and continuing education in oncology is necessary for our nursing team. This is why we value educational opportunities such as the Osborne Lecture," notes Carla Schaefer DNP, RN, OCN, CENP, associate chief nursing officer at Rutgers Cancer Institute. This year's Elizabeth Gibby Osborne Lecture featured Donna Cardillo, MA, RN, CSP, FAAN, who is a is a certified meditation teacher, labyrinth facilitator, Reiki Master, and Certified Forest Therapy Guide. Read More
$3.5M NIH Grant to Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Will Support a New ‘Lens’ in Lung Cancer Screening
May 12 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 121,472 | Sentiment : Positive
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OncLive - With the aid of a $3.5 million National Institutes of Health grant, investigators from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey – the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center – along with Holden Cancer Center at the University of Iowa, and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, are collaborating on a project to address lung cancer screening disparities among individuals with a history of heavy smoking. The researchers will assess the effectiveness of a decision support intervention called TELESCOPE that will be the focus of a randomized clinical trial to be opened at 40 primary care practices within the Combined Medical Group of RWJBarnabas Health and in collaboration with Rutgers Cancer Institute. The study is led by principal investigators Anita Kinney, PhD, director of the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence at Rutgers Cancer Institute and Rutgers School of Public Health along with Richard M. Hoffman, MD, MPH, professor of internal medicine at University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and Robert J. Volk, PhD, professor in the Department of Health Services Research at MD Anderson Cancer Center. “There is currently much uncertainty about how to most effectively engage patients in shared decision making for lung cancer screening,” notes Dr. Kinney, who is also associate director for Population Science and Community Outreach at Rutgers Cancer Institute and professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at Rutgers School of Public Health. Read More
Studies of the Future: Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer at Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center
May 18 | Online Publication| Samantha Anton  |  Reach: 1,493,932 | Sentiment : Positive
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TAPinto.net - Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center, in Livingston, has been at the forefront of the treatment of breast cancer for decades. Anya Litvak, M.D., a breast medical oncologist at The Cancer Center at Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center, is a principle investigator of a number of breast cancer clinical trials at the medical center. “We have always prided ourselves with offering clinical trials of novel treatments of early stage and metastatic breast cancers—many of which have been FDA approved,” she says. Drs. Anya Litvak and M. Michele Blackwood, M.D., chief of breast surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Northern Regional Director of breast services for RWJBarnabas Health, in collaboration with Rutgers Cancer Institute, are currently working on the I-SPY 2 clinical trial, a series of trials that will change the way new treatments are developed for patients with stage 2 or 3 breast cancer that require treatment before undergoing surgery. “It’s an adaptive clinical trial for high risk breast cancer, and we are able to provide patients with novel agents to see if the cancer shrinks better with these treatments than with standard chemotherapy, ” says principal investigator, Dr. Blackwood. Read More
Increased Risk of Skin Cancer Seen in Military Veterans
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May 19 | Online Publication| Jordyn Sava  |  Reach: 68,912 | Sentiment : Neutral
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Targeted Oncology - Some of the risks for the military veteran population include having an increased exposure to UV radiation, minimal sun-protective strategies, and a lack of education surrounding the risks of UV exposure, yet the majority of military veterans have never been screened for skin cancer by a physician, according to researchers at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. According to Carolyn J. Heckman, PhD, associate professor of Medicine and co-leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, another reason for the elevated risk of skin cancer in this patient population is due to the fact that older White men are over-represented in the military. “Veterans are more likely to be older White men, and they're going to be at higher risk based on their age, race, and sex. There are physical, genetic, and behavioral factors that play a role. More sun exposure, indoor tanning, if they don't protect their skin, or wear clothing and hats can put them at risk,” stated Heckman. Read More
Asian Pacific Americans Cancer Disparities
May 19 | Broadcast  |  Reach: N/A | Sentiment : Neutral
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NEWS12NJ - Newark, NJ - Rutgers university explores cancer among a community hailing from over 40 countries and 50 ethnic groups. Despite this diversity, the population is often lumped together regarding health statistics. This leads to disparities in treatment. So the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey is bringing those disparities to light. Read More
Intestinal Microbiome May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of MSI Colon Cancers, Study Suggests
May 19 | Online Publication| Emily Henderson  |  Reach: 4,084,882 | Sentiment : Neutral
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News-Medical.Net - Investigators from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey's only National Cancer Institute- Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, led a collaborative study to examine the patterns of druggable oncogenic fusions in colon cancer specimens including microsatellite-stable and unstable tumors. Subhajyoti De, PhD, researcher at Rutgers Cancer Institute and Shridar Ganesan, MD, PhD, chief of molecular oncology, associate director for translational research, and Omar Boraie Chair in Genomic Science at Rutgers Cancer Institute, who are both faculty members at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, are senior authors of the work and share more about the findings published in the online version of JCO Precision Oncology. This collaborative project examined the patterns of druggable oncogenic fusions in 32,218 colon cancer specimens including microsatellite-stable and unstable tumors. Read More
Exploring Cancer & Health Data on Asian American & Pacific Islanders
May 19 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - The Asian American and Pacific Islander community collectively represents people of many different origins who speak a diverse array of languages and have unique cultural backgrounds. Antoinette Stroup, PhD, of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey's only National Cancer Institute – Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center together with RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers School of Public Health is the director of the New Jersey State Cancer Registry. "First and foremost, be aware that AAPIs are not a homogenous population. The AAPI diaspora are individuals who represent a wide variety of cultures with ancestries stemming from a vast Asian continent and, as is the case of Pacific Islanders, many oceans apart," he said. Read More
Colon Cancer Screening Equity Remains Elusive for Blacks & Latinos
May 22 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 256,871 | Sentiment : Neutral
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TrialSite News - A study led by Denalee O’Malley, Ph.D., assistant professor of Family Medicine and Community Health at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, found this to be the case in ongoing investigations into the primary care implementation approaches for colorectal cancer screening associated with different racial and ethnic groups. A member of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence recently discussed some of the research findings. It's no secret for most—at least middle to upper-middle-class folks that colon cancer screening represents a cost-effective way to reduce diagnosis and improve early detection. (Subscription Required) Read More
How Oncology Providers Can Help Mitigate CRC Screening Disparities
May 24 | Online Publication| Ryan Scott  |  Reach: 17,842 | Sentiment : Neutral
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Oncology Nursing News - Oncology providers can implement strategies to help improve colorectal cancer screening rates among their patients, according to Denalee O'Malley, PhD. Structural racism, income inequality, and geographic barriers can all affect screening access, however, leveraging the provision of resources and support available to qualified health centers can be useful in combatting these barriers. In the interview, O'Malley, who is also a member of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program and a research member of the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, shed light on racial and ethnic disparities in CRC screening, and strategies that can be used to address existing barriers in the clinic and beyond. O’Malley: I am currently working on a project funded by the National Cancer Institute called “Optimizing CRC Screening Among Patients with Diabetes in Safety-Net Primary Care Settings,” to target implementation approaches. Read More
Maria J. Kowzun, MD, FACS, a Surgical With Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
May 25 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 5,000 | Sentiment : Positive
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YorkPedia - Recognized as a caring and compassionate surgical oncologist specializing in breast surgery, Dr. Kowzun is an attending physician at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and serves as the Director of the Center for Breast Health and Disease Management at Clara Maass Medical Center. She is also an Assistant Professor of Surgery within the Division of Surgical Oncology and Section of Breast Surgery at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick. She currently sees patients at both Rutgers CINJ in New Brunswick and Clara Maass Medical Center in Belleville, NJ. "My ultimate goal is to offer my patients the best quality of care according to the most recent practice recommendations and surgical techniques with a caring and compassionate smile” expressed the doctor. Read More
Dr. Goel on the Need for Diverse Representation in Clinical Trials
May 26 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 121,473 | Sentiment : Neutral
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OncLive - Sanjay Goel, MD, MS, director of Phase I / Investigational Therapeutics, medical oncologist, professor of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Section of Solid Tumor, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, discusses the need for diverse representation in clinical trials. The population in the United States continues to get more diverse, and nearly half of the population identifies as non-Hispanic white, Goel says. Although Hispanic and Black communities are both growing, non-Hispanic White patients still comprise approximately 85%-90% of clinical trial enrollment, Goel adds. Due to disproportionate enrollment in clinical trials, some patients in the community are being treated with therapeutic interventions and decisions based on data generated from patients that may have different presentations of cancer, Goel explains. Read More
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and RWJBarnabas Health To Present Expansive, Diverse and Compelling New Cancer Research at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting
May 27 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 46,199,668 | Sentiment : Positive
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Yahoo! Finance - Physician-scientists from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and RWJBarnabas Health will present intriguing data from their innovative cancer clinical research program at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, to be held both in person in Chicago and online from June 3-7. A total of 14 presentations, including 13 abstracts and one education session, have been accepted, highlighting research advances in several types of cancer, including leukemia, lymphoma, lung cancer and colorectal cancer. "Our passionate team of dedicated, globally recognized physicians and translational researchers is at the vanguard of transforming cancer management, working to develop new treatments, enhance patient care and professional support, and most importantly improve patient outcomes for the multitude of cancers we diagnose and treat," said Andrew M. Evens, DO, MSc, FACP, Associate Director, Clinical Services, Rutgers Cancer Institute; and System Director, Medical Oncology and Oncology Lead, Combined Medical Group, RWJBarnabas Health. Read More
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Drugs Targeting Kinase Fusions May Boost Outcomes in Some Microsatellite-Instable Colorectal Cancers
May 31 | Online Publication| Marilynn Larkin  |  Reach: 7,919,821 | Sentiment : Neutral
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Medscape - In patients with microsatellite instable colorectal cancer harboring druggable kinase fusions, combination therapy targeting specific fusions along with immune checkpoint blockade may improve long-term outcomes, a genomic analysis suggests. "A subset of CRC occurs in the setting of an underlying defect in mismatch repair, leading to MSI, which is characterized by variation in the length of microsatellite repeats," Dr. Shridar Ganesan and Dr. Subhajyoti De, both of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, told Reuters Health by email. (Subscription Required) Read More
HOPES Community Action Partnership, Incorporated Invites You to Our Community Resource Fair!
May 31 | Online Publication| Thomas Hughes  |  Reach: 1,493,932 | Sentiment : Neutral
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TAPinto.net - The HOPES Community Resource Fair will be held on Saturday, June 11, 2022, from 10 AM to 2 PM at the HOPES Early Childhood and Family Services Center, located at 1201 East 7th Street, Plainfield, New Jersey. Some local organizations that are planning to attend: ScreenNJ/Rutgers Cancer Institute of NJ. Read More
Chronic Kidney Disease and Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer: Perioperative and Oncologic Outcomes in 1,214 Patients
May 31 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 26,751 | Sentiment : Neutral
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UroToday - To assess the impact of chronic kidney disease on outcomes after radical cystectomy in patients with bladder cancer treated within a high-volume tertiary referral center. We identified 722 (59.5%) patients in Group A, 448 (36.9%) in Group B, and 44 (3.6%) in Group C. Patients with worse CKD were older and had significantly worse overall comorbidity (all P < 0.001). Researchers include: Charles Nguyen, Saum Ghodoussipour of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Matthew Winter, Giovanni Cacciamani, Hamed Ahmadi, Hooman Djaladat, Anne K Schuckman, Siamak Daneshmand, Monish Aron, Inderbir Gill, Mihir Desai. Read More
Jefferson Investigates: A New Disease, COVID Immunity and Triple Combo Therapy for Glioblastoma
May 31 | Organization| Roni Dengler  |  Reach: N/A | Sentiment : Neutral
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The Nexus - Thomas Jefferson University - A novel fibrotic disease with surprising nerve symptoms, an explanation for COVID immunity in the immunocompromised and a new approach for brain cancer. In a paper published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, the Jefferson team with collaborators from Robert Wood Johnson University describe a novel disease in which nerves across the body are progressively encroached upon by excessive accumulation of fibrotic tissue. Through the work, the researchers hope to identify additional patients, uncover the syndrome’s origin and develop effective treatment options. Read More
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