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RUTGERS CANCER INSTITUTE IN THE NEWS MARCH 2022
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Health Care Power 50: L – Z
Mar 28 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 24,599 | Sentiment : Positive
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NJBIZ - Jack and Sheryl Morris: Jack Morris, a Highland Park native, has been in the real estate development business for more than 32 years. He founded Jack Morris Construction when he was 18, specializing in custom home-building. He now serves as president and CEO of Edgewood Properties Inc., which owns, operates and manages commercial and residential real estate around the country. But for the purposes of this list, he and his wife, Sheryl, are best known as benefactors behind what will become the the state’s first free-standing cancer hospital, from RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. The 510,000-square-foot structure will be named the Jack and Sheryl Morris Cancer Center in recognition of the couple’s philanthropic leadership. “There is nothing that feels better or more gratifying than helping others in need,” Jack Morris said at a groundbreaking ceremony last June. (Subscription Required) Read More
No. 8: Steven Libutti
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Mar 28 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 24,599 | Sentiment : Positive
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NJBIZ - Libutti is the director of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and vice chancellor for Cancer Programs at Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. The institute broke ground last year on a new cancer pavilion in New Brunswick that’ll fill oncological treatment needs all in one hub: laboratory services, an outpatient clinic, infusion/chemotherapy suite, radiation oncology, imaging, and international radiology. “Offering the opportunity to transition eligible patients from infusion centers to home-based infusion of chemotherapy for the first time in New Jersey speaks to our mission of providing the most compassionate world-class cancer care and is what we strive to do with this pilot program,” he said at the time. (Subscription Required) Read More
45 Is the New 50 for Colorectal Cancer Screening
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Mar 01 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force recommends that people begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45, rather than 50, which was the previous recommendation. The updated guidelines consider the benefits of early detection and treatment for adults with no personal history or increased risk of the disease. Howard S. Hochster, MD, FACP, director of the Gastrointestinal Oncology Program and Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey Associate Director for Clinical Research and director of Oncology Research, RWJBarnabas Health, shares more about this change and why it is important. Read More
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HealthNewsDigest.com
Syndicated Reach: TM - 266
Multiple Myeloma: More Common Than You Think
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Mar 01 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 2,292 | Sentiment : Neutral
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Mega Doctor News - Multiple Myeloma is the second most common blood cancer in the United States, although it is not well known to the general public. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 35,000 people in the United States this year will learn they have multiple myeloma. Awareness of this disease is key to help increase early detection and improve long-term outcomes. Mansi R. Shah, MD, hematologist-oncologist in the Multiple Myeloma Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, shares critical information and key trends about the disease. Dr. Mansi Shah discusses multiple myeloma causes, treatment and research at New Jersey’s only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, Rutgers Cancer Institute, in collaboration with RWJBarnabas Health. Read More
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HealthNewsDigest.com and New Jersey Patch
Syndicated Reach: TM - 10,314,250
Why Is Colorectal Cancer on the Rise in Younger People?
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Mar 01 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - In recent years, colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths among individuals younger than 50 years of age have increased, which has raised many questions about who should be screened for colorectal cancer and has even prompted the United States Preventative Task Force and American Cancer Society to update their screening recommendations. Patrick Boland, MD, medical oncologist in the Gastrointestinal Oncology Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey shares insight on this topic. Read More
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HealthNewsDigest.com
Syndicated Reach: TM - 266
Finding Resources for Colorectal Cancer Screening
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Mar 01 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - By raising awareness about colorectal cancer and minority health disparities, communities, organizations and health professionals can take action toward prevention and early detection. Anita Kinney, PhD, RN, FAAN, FABMR director of the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence at Rutgers School of Public Health and Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, associate director for Population Science and Community Outreach and Engagement at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, professor of biostatistics and epidemiology at Rutgers School of Public Health and director of ScreenNJ, a statewide cancer screening program that aims to increase screening for colorectal and lung cancer, shares more about barriers and available resources. Read More
Racial & Ethnic Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Screeing
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Mar 01 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Denalee O'Malley, PhD, assistant professor of Family Medicine and Community Health at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School participates in research examining the impact of primary care implementation approaches for colorectal cancer screening on racial and ethnic disparities comparing types of screening tests used for patients with diabetes. She is a member of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and a research member of the Cancer Health Equity Center of Excellence at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and shares more about this topic. Read More
Growing Together: The Role of Social Workers in Cancer Care
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Mar 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Cancer is a challenging disease with many aspects. Psychosocial support services have powerful benefits on the success of a patient's treatment and recovery. When Joan Hogan, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, became manager of Social Work Services at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey last year, her vision was to expand supportive programming through a specialized team that works closely with patients, families, and caregivers in navigating the cancer journey. Read More
Pediatric Oncology Social Workers: Supporting Children & Families
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Mar 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Oncology social workers adapt to different modes of service provision to meet the needs of patients and families through their cancer journey. Susan Stephens, MSW, LCSW, ACSW, social worker at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey shares more about providing care to patients and families. Read More
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HealthNewsDigest.com
Syndicated Reach: TM - 266
Food for Thought: Nutrition and Cancer
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Mar 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Good nutrition is an important part of overall health, whether you're a cancer patient, survivor, caregiver, or loved one, and practicing healthy eating has been shown to help prevent cancer and cancer recurrence. Kristin Waldron, RD, CSO, clinical dietitian at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, shares more. Read More
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HealthNewsDigest.com
Syndicated Reach: TM - 266
Nutrition in Children & Young People With Cancer
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Mar 02 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Eating well during cancer treatment is important for a child or young adult as this helps them to cope better with their cancer treatment, fight infection and repair tissues damaged by therapies such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Lori Magoulas PhD, RD, nutritionist in the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, shares tips for parents on how to help their child eat well during cancer treatment. Read More
Multiple Myeloma: More Common Than You Think
Mar 03 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Dr. Mansi Shah discusses multiple myeloma causes, treatment and research at New Jersey's only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, Rutgers Cancer Institute, in collaboration with RWJBarnabas Health. "There are a number of treatment options for multiple myeloma to attempt control over the disease. Treatment for myeloma does not cure the disease but it decreases symptoms and allows people to live longer," he said. Read More
What You Need To Know About Kidney Cancer
Mar 03 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 10,314,250 | Sentiment : Neutral
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New Jersey Patch - Eric A. Singer, MD, MA, MS, FACS is associate chief of Urology and director of the Kidney Cancer Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; and associate professor of surgery and radiology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. "Risk factors for developing kidney cancer include smoking tobacco, obesity, high blood pressure and people who receive long-term dialysis to treat chronic kidney failure. Additionally, if someone in your family is known to have had kidney cancer, the chances for you to develop kidney cancer are greater," he said. Read More
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HealthNewsDigest.com
Syndicated Reach: TM - 266
World Trade Center Responders at Higher Risk for Blood Cancer-Associated Mutations
Mar 07 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 552,831 | Sentiment : Neutral
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EurekAlert! - The research team included scientists and physicians from Vanderbilt, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, the Fire Department of the City of New York Bureau of Health Services, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Weill Cornell Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, Genoptix, The Leukemia Lymphoma Society and Dana Farber Cancer Center. Read More
Also syndicated in:
US News Mail, Mirage News, Reporter Wings, Honest Columnist, YoursHeadline, Verve times, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Blank World Maps, Nation World News, Swifttelecast and 1 More
Syndicated Reach: TM - 472,911
For Edgewood Properties, 30 years of building — and giving back
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Mar 07 | Online Publication| Tom Bergeron  |  Reach: 18,241 | Sentiment : Positive
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ROI-NJ - Jack Morris, in big party at Hard Rock, uses anniversary of his development company to thank all who have helped him along the way. His commitment to philanthropy was never greater than last summer, when he and his wife made a substantial contribution to help fund what will be called the Jack and Sheryl Morris Cancer Center, a 12-story, 500,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art cancer center that will be part of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. “There is nothing that feels better or more gratifying than helping others in need,” Morris said at the time. Morris, the founding chair of RWJBarnabas Health, also serves as chairman of Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and has served as a board member of the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Foundation. Read More
Evaluate Relighting Behavior Among People Who Smoke
Mar 08 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 266 | Sentiment : Positive
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HealthNewsDigest.com - The Center for Tobacco Studies at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey received a $2.6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to evaluate cigarette relighting – the practice of smoking a cigarette, extinguishing it, and lighting it again to smoke – as well as its consequences on health and efforts to quit smoking. “We have very little evidence as to how common relighting is, why people might relight their cigarettes, what exposure and toxins people who relight their cigarettes might be experiencing, and how relighting cigarettes might affect their success in trying to quit smoking. The study is about exploring all of those aspects,” said Steinberg, who is also a research member in the Clinical Investigations and Precision Therapeutics Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute. Read More
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Fairmont Post and Mirage News
Syndicated Reach: TM - 100,205
Rutgers Gets $2.6M Grant To Study Impact of Re-Lighting Cigarettes – Potentially Changing Key Data Points on Smoking
Mar 10 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 18,241 | Sentiment : Positive
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ROI-NJ - The Center for Tobacco Studies at Rutgers recently received a $2.6 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to evaluate cigarette relighting, as well as its consequences on health and efforts to quit smoking. The grant was awarded to three doctors associated with the center: Carolyn Heckman, associate professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and co-leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; “We will be surveying patients about their relighting behavior, their attempts to quit, and what medications they are using because we think relighting may be associated with difficulty in quitting,” Heckman said. Read More
Women’s History Month: She Teaches Dedication to Science and the Pursuit of Truth
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Mar 10 | Online Publication| Jessie Yanxiang Guo  |  Reach: 5,372,566 | Sentiment : Positive
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NJ.com - Eileen White is Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey deputy director, chief scientific officer, and associate director for basic research. I have known about Dr. White’s research since I was a graduate student at Duke University because of her important contributions to the field of cell death in cancer. Her discovery leads to the novel concept that evading apoptosis, one kind of programmed cell death – the method the body uses to get rid of unneeded or abnormal cells – was one of the hallmarks of cancer. Jessie Yanxiang Guo is an associate professor, Division of Medical Oncology Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Resident member, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Read More
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Star-Ledger
Syndicated Reach: TM - 114,000
Urologic Oncologist Joins RWJBarnabas, Rutgers Medical Group
Mar 11 | Online Publication| Cailey Gleeson  |  Reach: 590,272 | Sentiment : Positive
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Becker's Hospital Review - Rahuldev Bhalla, MD, a fellowship-trained board-certified urologist, joined the combined medical group of RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Health, the systems said March 10. "The addition of Dr. Bhalla reinforces our commitment to providing access to exceptional healthcare throughout New Jersey," stated Andy Anderson, president and CEO of the combined medical group. Read More
M. Michele Blackwood, MD @RWJBarnabas @Rutgerscancer #I-SPY2 #BreastCancer Phase II I-Spy2 Trial
Mar 11 | Online Publication  |  Reach: N/A | Sentiment : Neutral
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Oncology Tube - M. Michele Blackwood, MD, FACS, Chief, Section of Breast Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Northern Regional Director of Breast Services, RWJBarnabas Health. In this video, she speaks about the I-SPY2 TRIAL: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer. Read More
Brain Cell Insight Could Lead to New Treatments for Neurological-Based Diseases
Mar 11 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 552,831 | Sentiment : Neutral
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EurekAlert! - In a new study, published in the journal Cell Reports, Rutgers researchers looked at cells known as oligodendrocytes in the brain and spinal cord that produce myelin, which protects nerve cells and allows them to work properly. "The cells look identical under a microscope, so everyone assumed they were the same," said Teresa Wood, a Distinguished Professor and the Rena Warshow Endowed Chair in Multiple Sclerosis, who led the Rutgers team. Wood is also a member of the Cancer Metabolism and Growth Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Read More
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Medical Xpress, Mirage News, HealthNewsDigest.com and AZoLifeSciences
Syndicated Reach: TM - 1,012,124
The Roaring 2020s: A New Decade of Systemic Therapy for Renal Cell Carcinoma
Mar 14 | Online Publication| Eric A Singer  |  Reach: 26,751 | Sentiment : Neutral
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UroToday - The genomic and immunologic profiling of renal cell carcinoma has provided the impetus for advancements in systemic treatments using combination therapy - either with immune check point inhibitor (ICI) + ICI or with ICI + targeted therapy. Arnav Srivastava, Sai K Doppalapudi, Hiren V Patel, Ramaprasad Srinivasan, Eric A Singer - Section of Urologic Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Read More
Healthy Living Tips From a Scientist: Diet, Nutrition, & Breast Cancer
Mar 16 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 2,882 | Sentiment : Neutral
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Breast Cancer Prevention Partners - Interview with Elisa V. Bandera, MD, PhD, Professor and Chief, Cancer Epidemiology and Health Outcomes; Co-Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control, and Unilever Chair for the Study of Diet and Nutrition in the Prevention of Chronic Disease, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Professor of Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. We asked BCPP Science Advisory Panel Member Elisa Bandera, MD, PhD, about her tips for healthy living. She shared with us the most important lifestyle steps that we can all take to improve our health through our diet, nutrition, and physical activity to reduce our breast cancer risk and the risk of other diseases. Read More
5 oncologists on the move
Mar 15 | Online Publication| Erica Carbajal  |  Reach: 590,272 | Sentiment : Positive
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Becker's Hospital Review - The following oncologists joined new practices or organizations in the last few weeks: Rahuldev Bhalla, MD, a fellowship-trained board-certified urologist, joined the combined medical group of RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Health, the systems said March 10. He will provide urologic oncology services in partnership with the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Read More
Irvington Resident Beats Cancer, Enjoys Zamboni Ride at New Jersey Devils Game
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Mar 16 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 139,886 | Sentiment : Positive
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RLS Media - On Sunday, March 6th, Shantel Cogman of Irvington enjoyed a one-of-a-kind experience at the Prudential Center as the New Jersey Devils defeated the St. Louis Blues 3-2 in OT. She went to the Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey Breast Health Center at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center for a mammogram and was recommended to have a biopsy. Cogman started chemotherapy treatment in July of 2021 at the Frederick B. Cohen, MD, Comprehensive Cancer and Blood Disorders Center at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, an RWJBarnabas Health facility and a clinical component of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. For this special experience, the Cogman’s were joined by Dr. Sari Jacoby, the current Medical Director of the Frederick B. Cohen, MD, Comprehensive Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Read More
Also syndicated in:
Essex News Daily
Syndicated Reach: TM - 11,022
Renowned Urologic Oncologist Joins Combined Medical Group of RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Health
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Mar 17 | Online Publication| Linda Lindner  |  Reach: 18,241 | Sentiment : Positive
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ROI-NJ - Dr. Rahuldev Bhalla, a fellowship-trained, board-certified urologist, has joined the Combined Medical Group of RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers Health. He is affiliated with Cooperman Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston and will provide urologic oncology services in partnership with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state’s only NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. “The addition of Dr. Bhalla reinforces our commitment to providing access to exceptional healthcare throughout New Jersey,” said Andy Anderson, CEO and president, Combined Medical Group. Read More
Could Diet Modification Make Chemotherapy Drugs More Effective for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer?
Mar 21 | Organization  |  Reach: 552,831 | Sentiment : Neutral
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EurekAlert! - The findings of a new study suggest that a ketogenic diet — which is low in carbohydrates and protein, but high in fat — helps to kill pancreatic cancer cells when combined with a triple-drug therapy developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute, an affiliate of City of Hope. Also contributing to this study were: Princeton University, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Rutgers Cancer Institute and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Read More
Also syndicated in:
Mirage News
Syndicated Reach: TM - 100,205
Cracking the Code of Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Mar 22 | Organization| Kendall K. Morgan  |  Reach: N/A | Sentiment : Neutral
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Cancer Today - Given Ferraro’s dangerously high blast count, she was admitted to the hospital two days after her diagnosis to start an intensive combination chemotherapy regimen. She spent the next 33 days in the hospital undergoing treatment. She learned that her cancer had an inversion on chromosome 16, an abnormality sometimes found in AML that’s associated with a more favorable outcome. But her leukemia cells also carried a mutation in a gene called TP53, found in 5% to 10% of AML cases, and this feature is associated with a worse AML outlook. The genetic findings prompted her doctor at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey, to put her on a more intensive chemotherapy regimen known as MEC. Read More
RWJUH Hamilton: Catching the Most Common Cancers
Mar 30 | Online Publication  |  Reach: 50,114 | Sentiment : Positive
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Community News - “It’s important to get recommended screening tests even if you are not experiencing any particular symptoms,” says Malini Patel, MD, director of medical oncology at the Cancer Center at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (RWJUH) Hamilton, RWJBarnabas Health. “Screening can detect cancers at early stages, which makes them easier to cure and treat. When people start experiencing symptoms, cancers may be at a more advanced stage that makes these diseases more challenging to control.” Read More
Also syndicated in:
TAPinto.net
Syndicated Reach: TM - 1,493,932
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